my japanese chicken farm

head rooster, japanese chicken farm

head rooster, japanese chicken farm

Japanese chickens are a wonderful breed – quite prolific and easily raised.  A healthy, robust gathering is a grand sight and sound. All that’s needed for them to flourish is a little encouragement and a couple of lively imaginations, and oh boy howdy! Before you can say, “Here chick chick chick,” you’ve got a flock the size of Manhattan.

My first encounter with these marvels of vocal engineering was around the turn of the century (21st, that is), when japanese chickens were officially introduced. Well … that’s not entirely true. I’ve been a master chicken farmer my whole life, but just didn’t know it.

Here’s the story of the japanese chicken and how it came to be named.

One bright and sunny day in the not too distant past, my friend and her two youngest kids came over to visit. We always have a wonderful time when we get together, and that day was no exception. Even the kids got a word or two in!

About an hour into our lively discussion, John suddenly leaned his chair back, tapped his fingers on the table (he didn’t have a gavel, so fingers had to suffice), and said, “Japanese chickens.”

Well, that brought our conversation to a cackling halt! Hard to talk with our mouths gaping open. When we recovered our voices, we both asked, almost simultaneously, “What??”

He again leaned his chair back, looked at his wristwatch with a grand flourish, and said, “Well, we’ve been here about an hour, and you guys started out talking about Japanese stuff, and now you’re talking about chickens. How did you get from Japanese to chickens, all in the same conversation?”

Such an amazing, observant young man. At the age of 12 (or … was it 13??  I can’t remember), he had just coined the phrase, JAPANESE CHICKENS, to describe a conversation that goes from one subject to another to another, all totally unrelated – and yet, at least for those involved in the conversation, blending together as though each subject is a natural progression from the last one. That is a japanese chicken conversation.

This term is now known worldwide. My husband and I have shared it with friends and in our travels (both home and abroad), John the phrase-coiner spread it amongst his buddies, my friend shared it with her friends and family, and all those folks have shared it with the folks in their lives. And now I’m sharing it with you.

How many of these chickens do you raise each day? I’ve lost count of mine, but I know they’re alive and thriving, and spreading by the minute.

(This was shared for the weekly photo challenge, “Unexpected.” I never expected to find this huge ‘japanese chicken’ – cleverly disguised as a restaurant advertisement – on our travels! See, I told you it was known worldwide!)
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6 thoughts on “my japanese chicken farm

  1. Most of my conversations start and end like that LubyGirl Wow now I have a name for them, thank you, I don’t think it has reached down under yet, anyway I haven’t heard if it has but the weather is really good down here, so many beautiful flowers all around they are all colors, you can smell their Oops Japanese Chickens!

    Been nice talking to yu – Blessings Anne

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    • Well, now japanese chickens are known Down Under too – so I can ‘officially’ say they’re known worldwide. 😆 And you raise some pretty healthy ones too, I see out the window pretty clearly today is the last of November! (that’s how our japanese chickens get hatched…one word leads to another thought, and then we’re off and running, chasing japanese chickens everywhere!) Good to hear from you!

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